How to Get a Teaching Job Abroad

How to Get a Teaching Job Abroad: Step by Step Guide

So you’ve decided you want to take the leap and teach abroad. Now what? In this post, I share how to get a teaching job abroad – step by step. This post will help you begin your teach abroad adventure.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. This means that if you choose to use one of my links, I receive a small commission – at no cost to you! Thank you for supporting my business and helping people teach abroad.

Get a Teaching Job Abroad as a Native English Speaker with a Bachelor’s Degree

Teach English abroad as a native speaker with a degree

If you are a native English speaker with a bachelor’s degree, there are a lot of options for you to teach English abroad! Follow these steps to find out how.

Step 1: Get TEFL Certified

TEFL stands for “Teaching English as a Foreign Language.” While not all teach abroad programs will require a TEFL certificate, I highly recommend getting one before teaching abroad.

First of all, you’ll be able to apply to more programs if you have a TEFL certificate. If this is your first teach abroad job or you are on a budget, I recommend doing a TEFL course with Premier TEFL. All their courses are accredited and they provide student support.

For most teach abroad jobs, you’ll need a TEFL certificate of at least 120-hours. The Premier TEFL 120-hour course can be completed in 3-6 weeks.

If you are serious about making teaching English abroad your career, then I recommend doing a CELTA course. CELTA is basically the Cambridge brand of TEFL. This course is the industry standard, so it’s quite expensive and intensive, but worth it. I completed my CELTA course in Australia.

Step 2: Choose a Teach Abroad Program

The most popular teach abroad programs for native English speakers with a bachelor’s degree are language assistant programs abroad. If you are a certified teacher, skip ahead to that section.

Language assistant programs place teachers in public, private or charter schools, depending on the program. As a language assistant, you will often work with a local teacher in their classroom and provide extra support. 

Your duties as a language assistant will vary from program to program. You may pull out students to prepare for English language exams, support the local teacher or plan and teach all the lessons on your own. 

I recommend reaching out to a current or former teacher from the programs you are interested in to find out what their experience is like. Many language assistant programs have Facebook groups for current and former teachers. 

Here are some of the top language assistant programs you can apply to:

North American Language and Cultural Assistant Program in Spain – also known as “Auxiliares de Conversación,” this program places teachers in public schools all around Spain.

UCETAM in Madrid, Spain – if you’d like to teach specifically in school in Madrid, then you can apply to be a language assistant through UCETAM.

EPIK & TaLK Programs in South Korea – if you have a degree, you can apply to teach in South Korea through EPIK. This program offers great benefits like paid flights, accommodation, bonuses and more. If you have an associate’s degree or above, you can apply to teach elementary students in the TaLK program.

JET Programme in Japan – perfect for teachers with an interest in Japan, this language assistant program offers a competitive salary, paid flights and holidays and more.

TAPIF in France – if you have at least an intermediate level of French (B1), then you can apply to teach English in French schools. 

Check out this post for more language assistant programs.

Tips for Teaching with Language Assistant Programs:

  • Each program has different application deadlines, often opening once or twice per year. Make sure you begin preparing your application a few months before the deadline. You’ll have a better chance of getting a position if you apply when applications open.
  • For most programs, you’ll need a professional and/or academic reference, so make sure to ask for this ahead of time.
  • Each program has different requirements in terms of eligible countries, so make sure your country of citizenship is on this list. 
  • You can apply to more than one program. Just be aware that some programs will require you to accept your position within a few weeks or days.

Step 3: Prepare to Teach Abroad

Then, once you’ve been accepted into a language assistant program to teach English abroad, you’ll need to start the visa process. Most language assistant programs will help you with the visa paperwork, although there may be some parts of the process that you’ll need to do on your own.

Note: Depending on your program, you may receive a work or student visa. If you are on a student visa, you may have to study something as part of your program in order to justify the visa. This will vary from country to country.

Make sure to follow the visa instructions from your program exactly and give yourself enough time. If there is an issue with your visa, you won’t be able to teach abroad.

Since language assistant programs provide a set salary or stipend, there isn’t a need to negotiate your salary or contract. Some programs will require an enrollment fee or deposit which may or may not be refundable.

Before you go abroad, make sure your finances are in order and think of how you will supplement your income abroad, if needed. This post will help you sort out your teach abroad finances.

As your departure date gets closer, here are some ideas on what to pack when moving abroad to teach English.

If your program doesn’t offer accommodation, I recommend staying at a hotel, hostel or AirBnB for the first week or two while you search for a place to live. I wouldn’t recommend setting up housing from abroad. Wait until you are in the country and can physically inspect the housing.

Alternate Route: Apply to schools directly or through a recruitment agency

If you don’t want to teach English through a language assistant program, you can apply to schools directly or go through a recruitment agency. I recommend this approach for people who are good at spotting scams, somewhat adventurous and have some previous travel experience.

If you’d like to find jobs independently, or find recruitment agencies, you can search on these international job boards: Dave’s ESL Cafe, TeachAway, GoAbroad

To find out what happens next in the process, skip ahead to steps 3, 4 and 5 of the next section “Get a teaching job abroad as a native English speaker without a bachelor’s degree.”

For other options, scroll down to “Other Visa Options”

If you’re feeling unsure about actually teaching, setting up banking abroad, how to find an apartment abroad, making friends and more, I offer a 5-week teach abroad coaching program for beginners or teach abroad consulting for people who want to fast track their teach abroad process.

Get a Teaching Job Abroad as a Native English Speaker without a Bachelor’s Degree

Teach English abroad as a native speaker without a degree

If you are a native English speaker but don’t have a bachelor’s degree, there are still opportunities to work as an English teacher abroad. While most countries prefer to hire teachers with a bachelor’s degree, with a bit of persistence and patience, you’ll be able to get a teaching job abroad.

Step 1: Get TEFL Certified

TEFL stands for “Teaching English as a Foreign Language.” Getting a TEFL certificate is a MUST if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree. 

If this is your first teach abroad job or you are on a budget, I recommend doing a TEFL course with Premier TEFL. All their courses are accredited and they provide student support.

For most teach abroad jobs, you’ll need a TEFL certificate of at least 120-hours. The Premier TEFL 120-hour course can be completed in 3-6 weeks.

If you are serious about making teaching English abroad your career, then I recommend doing a CELTA course. CELTA is the Cambridge brand TEFL certificate. This course is the industry standard, so it’s quite expensive and intensive, but worth it. I completed my CELTA course in Australia.

Step 2: Choose Where to Teach Abroad

If you don’t have a bachelor’s degree, some countries won’t be open to you. This is because some countries require a bachelor’s degree in order to sponsor your visa to teach English abroad. 

You may hear of people teaching in countries where a degree is required without a degree. This is often because they come into the country on a tourist visa and teach “under the table” (illegally.) I wouldn’t recommend this because if you are caught, you could be deported and barred from entering the country again.

Sometimes it is possible to change from a tourist visa to a work or business visa. Scroll down to “Other Visa Options” to find out more.

Here is a list of countries where you can get a teaching job abroad without a degree

Please be aware that visa policies can change at any time and some countries will require you to be from certain countries in order to issue work visas (especially the EU)

  • Cambodia
  • Laos
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Most countries in Latin America
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Poland
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Egypt
  • Jordan
  • Lebanon

Step 3: Find teaching positions abroad

Next, narrow down your search to 3-5 countries where you’d like to teach. 

You have two options: apply to schools directly or go through a recruitment agency.

You can begin your search on these international job boards: Dave’s ESL Cafe, TeachAway, GoAbroad

Unfortunately, while online job boards can be a great resource (this is where I found my first job in Costa Rica!), they are also filled with scams. Fake agencies, schools and recruiters try to take advantage of inexperienced teachers.

How to spot a scam:

  • Always ask to speak to a current FOREIGN teacher who is working at the school – if they won’t allow this, or only allow you to talk to a LOCAL teacher, then it’s most likely a scam. Some schools even pay off local teachers to talk up the program to foreign teachers abroad.
  • Never send money large sums of money abroad – you should not send large amounts of money over for a “visa,” “accommodation,” or “service fee.” These are scams. Some language assistant programs will require a fee or deposit, but it’s usually small and often refundable upon completion of your contract. If the agency/recruiter/school is asking for a large transfer of money – it’s a scam.
  • Read as many reviews of the school or agency as you can – however, read these with a grain of salt. Sometimes schools are great and then come under new management and are horrible. Again, try to speak with a current foreign teacher.
  • Always have a Plan B – in case you arrive abroad and the school or program isn’t expected, what will you do? Make this plan BEFORE you arrive. I had a homestay lined up when I went to Egypt and was told the moment that I got picked up that I wouldn’t be able to stay there. Plan ahead for the worst and it will be less stressful if something goes wrong.
  • Check the email address of the person you are communicating with – does it match the official website? This is a common scam where people create random email addresses that are similar to the school or agency, but not exact. They will usually ask you to transfer money to them and then disappear.

Step 4: Interview and Negotiation

Once you’ve made contact with several schools/agencies, you’ll need to set up interviews. You can do this by sending your teach abroad resume/CV to the agency, school or recruiter.

Make sure that your resume/CV is teach abroad ready with these tips. 

Interviews are usually conducted via Skype or Zoom. Some jobs may require a short demo lesson as well, so make sure to prepare a 10-15 minute lesson and lesson plan before you start interviewing. 

Possible interview topics:

  • Introduction including name, nationality and degree
  • Why you want to teach in ___________
  • How you will deal with behavioral issues, class management in general
  • Your teaching style, how you deal with students with different levels, why You would be a good teacher
  • Why you are passionate about education, what kinds of students you want to teach
  • What you know about ____________ culture

After you’ve made it past the interview process and you’re offered a contract, you’ll want to negotiate:

  • Salary – make sure you are being offered a similar salary to other teachers at the school and in terms of the cost of living. To check the cost of living, visit numbeo.com.
  • Benefits like vacation time, accommodation, etc. – if the school wants to give you a lower salary, you can try to negotiate with benefits

Now, it’s time to review the contract and begin the visa process! Your contract should include:

  • Salary and benefits
  • Working hours and conditions
  • Visa conditions

Read through your contract and make sure it matches what was decided upon in your interview. Don’t sign the contract until you are happy with it. 

Step 5: Prepare to teach abroad

You can begin the visa process once you have your contact. Each country has different visa requirements, so make sure to reach out to your local embassy or consulate of the country where you’ll be teaching for help.

Give yourself enough time to complete the visa paperwork before you leave. Visa paperwork often includes getting a background check, getting a certified copy of your TEFL certificate and sometimes getting a visa stamped or affixed in your passport. Again, each country has a different process so make sure to find out exactly what you need to do.

Before you go abroad, make sure your finances are in order and think of how you will supplement your income abroad, if needed. This post will help you sort out your teach abroad finances.

I highly recommend teaching English online for a few months before you go abroad. This will help you gain experience and confidence, especially if this is your first time teaching abroad. 

Additionally, I recommend working for an online teaching company that allows you to teach from anywhere. This means that you can continue to teach online while teaching abroad in order to earn some extra income and have more job security. Check out my teach online resources here.

As your departure date gets closer, here are some ideas on what to pack when moving abroad to teach English.

If your program doesn’t offer accommodation, I recommend staying at a hotel, hostel or AirBnB for the first week or two while you search for a place to live. I wouldn’t recommend setting up housing from abroad. Wait until you are in the country and can physically inspect the housing.

For other options, scroll down to “Other Visa Options”

If you’re feeling unsure about how to find a program, setting up banking abroad, renting an apartment abroad, making friends and more, I offer a 5-week teach abroad coaching program for beginners or teach abroad consulting for people who want to fast track their teach abroad process. You can also email me at jamie@eslteacher365.com to learn more.

Get a Teaching Job Abroad as a Certified Teacher

Get a teaching job abroad as a certified teacher

If you are a certified teacher, there are schools where you can teach abroad called international schools. You don’t have to be an English teacher to teach abroad. For example, if you are a certified first grade teacher, you can find a job as a first grade teacher at an international school in another country.

Step 1: Get certified to teach

Make sure you have completed your student teaching requirements and have your teaching certificate BEFORE you apply to jobs at international schools. Many jobs cannot hire you if you don’t have your teaching credentials. This is because of the visa.

Step 2: Apply to international schools

Once you are certified to teach, you have two options: reach out to international schools or go through a recruitment agency.

How to get a teaching job in an international school on your own:

Some schools hire teachers directly. First, search for “international schools “ plus the country where you’d like to teach.

Example: international schools South Korea

Find a school’s official website and scroll to the bottom of the page or look in the search bar for options like “recruitment,” “work with us,” etc.

Next, follow the instructions on the website to apply for open positions. Some schools will list current open positions while others will ask for a cover letter and resume to keep on file for when positions become available.

How to go through a recruitment agency:

Some schools prefer to find teachers through recruitment agencies. The most popular ones are Search Associates and ISS. Teachers create an account and pay a fee to become a member. 

Members have access to open positions, salary and benefit information and recruitment fairs. Recruitment fairs are an easy way to meet representatives from international schools from all over the world and get job offers that day or week.

If you apply directly to a school, you often don’t have salary information. This means that going through an agency can be more worthwhile. Also, the schools that are part of these agencies are not scams and usually of high quality.

Step 3: Interview, negotiate and sign your contract

International school teaching positions can be very competitive, so make sure you prepare well for your interviews. Some schools will require previous teaching experience, letters of recommendation and even teaching portfolios, so make sure to prepare these things ahead of time.

Ask to speak to a current teacher to make sure the school is the right fit for you. You don’t want to move your whole life abroad and be miserable if it wasn’t what you were expecting.

International school contracts often include benefits like moving allowances, paid flights, accommodation, paid holidays and more. Some international schools will allow your dependents to come with you. Make sure to negotiate these things as well as your salary. 

When you are satisfied with the offer and have carefully read through the contract, you can sign it and begin the visa process. Congrats!

Step 4: Prepare to teach abroad

You can begin the visa process once you have your contact. International schools usually take care of the majority of the visa paperwork for you. You will most likely get a work or skilled visa. On your end, you’ll often need to supply certified copies of background checks, your teaching certification and degree and other documents.

Before you go abroad, make sure your finances are in order and think of how you will supplement your income abroad, if needed. This post will help you sort out your teach abroad finances.

I highly recommend teaching English online as a plan B when moving abroad. You never know what will happen abroad. If you lose your teaching position abroad and aren’t entitled to unemployment benefits because of your visa, you’ll want a backup plan.

I recommend working for an online teaching company that allows you to teach from anywhere. This also means that you can continue to teach online while teaching abroad in order to earn some extra income and have more job security. Check out my teach online resources here.

As your departure date gets closer, here are some ideas on what to pack when moving abroad to teach.

If your program doesn’t offer accommodation, I recommend staying at a hotel, hostel or AirBnB for the first week or two while you search for a place to live. I wouldn’t recommend setting up housing from abroad. Wait until you are in the country and can physically inspect the housing.

For other options, scroll down to “Other Visa Options”

If you’re feeling unsure about setting up banking abroad, how to find an apartment abroad, making friends and more, I offer teach abroad consulting to help you with any struggles you may have.

Get a Teaching Job Abroad as a Non-Native English Speaker

Get a teaching job abroad as a non native speaker

While most schools are looking to hire native English speakers, there are still positions to work as an English teacher abroad if you are a non-native speaker. While it may be more challenging, with a bit of luck and persistence, you can move to another country to teach English.

Step 1: Get your English level certified

You are more likely to get a teaching job abroad if you have a high level of English. 

If you’re not sure what your English level is, you can take a free English test here.

Most schools are looking for C1 (Advanced) or C2 (Proficiency) level English.

In order to prove your English level, you’ll need to take an official English language exam like: IELTS, Cambridge, or TOEFL. Different countries require different examinations, so make sure to check which exams are accepted in the country where you’d like to teach.

Step 2: Get TEFL certified and some experience

It’s a myth that you have to be a native English speaker to teach English. Non-native speakers are actually often better at explaining grammar since they’ve had to learn English, rather than absorb in naturally. 

In order to teach English abroad, you’ll need a TEFL certificate. TEFL stands for “Teaching English as a Foreign Language.” Getting a TEFL certificate is a MUST if you are a non-native English speaker.

If this is your first teach abroad job or you are on a budget, I recommend doing a TEFL course with Premier TEFL. All their courses are accredited and they provide student support.

For most teach abroad jobs, you’ll need a TEFL certificate of at least 120-hours. The Premier TEFL 120-hour course can be completed in 3-6 weeks.

If you are serious about making teaching English abroad your career, then I recommend doing a CELTA course. This course is the industry standard, so it’s quite expensive and intensive, but worth it. I completed my CELTA course in Australia.

About half of the students in my CELTA course were non-native speakers. Roughly half of the teachers at language schools I worked at in Australia were non-native speakers.

Once you have your TEFL certificate, I recommend teaching in your country and online to gain some experience. Because you are a non-native English speaker, schools abroad are more likely to hire you if you have some previous experience.

Check out these online teaching resources.

Step 3: Find teaching jobs abroad

If you are a non-native English speaker, it will be much easier to get hired if you have a bachelor’s degree. This is because some countries require a degree in order to issue a visa.

If you don’t have a degree and are a non-native speaker, it will be extremely difficult to find work abroad. It’s not impossible, but very challenging.

Here is a post from GoOverseas on where non-native English speakers can teach abroad.

If you are an EU citizen, it’s much easier for you to teach English in another European country since you have EU working rights. For those outside of the EU it can be very challenging to get work papers.

If you are from outside of the EU, I recommend searching for jobs in Cambodia, Thailand and Latin America.

Next, narrow down your search to 3-5 countries where you’d like to teach. 

You have two options: apply to schools directly or go through a recruitment agency.

You can begin your search on these international job boards: Dave’s ESL Cafe, TeachAway, GoAbroad

Unfortunately, while online job boards can be a great resource (this is where I found my first job in Costa Rica!), they are also filled with scams. Fake agencies, schools and recruiters try to take advantage of inexperienced teachers.

How to spot a scam:

  • Always ask to speak to a current FOREIGN teacher who is working at the school – if they won’t allow this, or only allow you to talk to a LOCAL teacher, then it’s most likely a scam. Some schools pay off local teachers to talk up the program to foreign teachers abroad.
  • Never send money abroad unless there is a small application fee for a reputable teach abroad program – you should not send large amounts of money over for a “visa,” “accommodation,” or “service fee.” These are scams. Some language assistant programs will require a fee or deposit, but it’s usually small and often refundable upon completion of your contract. If the agency/recruiter/school is asking for a large transfer of money – it’s a scam.
  • Read as many reviews of the school or agency as you can – however, read these with a grain of salt. Sometimes schools are great and then come under new management and are horrible. Again, try to speak with a current foreign teacher.
  • Always have a Plan B – in case you arrive abroad and the school or program isn’t expected, what will you do? Make this plan BEFORE you arrive. I had a homestay lined up when I went to Egypt and was told the moment that I got picked up that I wouldn’t be able to stay there. Plan ahead for the worst and it will be less stressful when something goes wrong.
  • Check the email address of the person you are communicating with – does it match the official website? This is a common scam where people create random email addresses that are similar to the school or agency, but not exact. They will usually ask you to transfer money to them and then disappear.

Step 4: Interview and Negotiation

Once you’ve made contact with several schools/agencies, you’ll need to set up interviews. You can do this by sending your teach abroad resume/CV to the agency, school or recruiter.

Make sure that your resume/CV is teach abroad ready with these tips. Make sure to include your English test scores on your resume/CV.

Interviews are usually conducted via Skype or Zoom. Some jobs may require a short demo lesson as well, so make sure to prepare a 10-15 minute lesson and lesson plan before you start interviewing. 

Possible interview topics:

  • Introduction including name, nationality and degree
  • Your previous teaching experience
  • Why you want to teach in ___________
  • How you will deal with behavioral issues, class management in general
  • Your teaching style, how you deal with students with different levels, why You would be a good teacher
  • Why you are passionate about education, what kinds of students you want to teach
  • What you know about ____________ culture

After  you’ve made it past the interview process and you’re offered a contract, you’ll want to negotiate:

  • Salary – make sure you are being offered a similar salary to other teachers at the school and in terms of the cost of living. To check the cost of living, visit numbeo.com.
  • Benefits like vacation time, accommodation, etc. – if the school wants to give you a lower salary, you can try to negotiate with benefits

Now, it’s time to review the contract and begin the visa process! Your contract should include:

  • Salary and benefits
  • Working hours and conditions
  • Visa conditions

Read through your contract and make sure it matches what was decided upon in your interview. Don’t sign the contract until you are happy with it. 

Step 5: Prepare to teach abroad

You can begin the visa process once you have your contact. Each country has different visa requirements, so make sure to reach out to your local embassy or consulate of the country where you’ll be teaching for help.

Make sure to give yourself enough time to complete the visa paperwork before you leave. Visa paperwork often includes getting a background check, getting a certified copy of your TEFL certificate and sometimes getting a visa stamped or affixed in your passport. Again, each country has a different process so make sure to find out exactly what you need to do.

Before you go abroad, make sure your finances are in order and think of how you will supplement your income abroad, if needed. This post will help you sort out your teach abroad finances.

I highly recommend teaching English online for a few months before you go abroad. This will help you gain experience and confidence, especially if this is your first time teaching abroad. 

Additionally, I recommend working for an online teaching company that allows you to teach from anywhere. This means that you can continue to teach online while teaching abroad in order to earn some extra income and have more job security. Check out my teach online resources here.

As your departure date gets closer, here are some ideas on what to pack when moving abroad to teach English.

If your program doesn’t offer accommodation, I recommend staying at a hotel, hostel or AirBnB for the first week or two while you search for a place to live. I wouldn’t recommend setting up housing from abroad. Wait until you are in the country and can physically inspect the housing.

For other options, scroll down to “Other Visa Options”

Other Visa Options for Getting a Teaching Job Abroad

Other visa options for teaching English abroad

It is preferable to get a job abroad from your home country. However, since you aren’t able to see the school or meet all the staff or students before you arrive, there is an element of risk.

If you are an avid traveler and a bit adventurous, it is possible to find teaching jobs abroad when you are already in the country. Here are some ways to do it:

Tourist Visa to a Work/Business Visa

Step 1: Find out which countries you can enter on a tourist visa

First of all, based on your passport, see which countries you can legally enter on a tourist visa. 

Step 2: Find out which countries let you change a tourist visa to another visa type

After you’ve made a list of the countries you can enter as a tourist, research to find out which countries allow you to change from a tourist to work or business visa. 

For example, see if you can enter a country as a tourist and then change to a work visa once you have a contract. This means that you can arrive in the country, interview in-person, and sign a contract. 

With the contract, and depending on the visa laws of that country, it might be possible to change your tourist visa to a work visa.

Obviously this option takes a lot of research on your part and reaching out to embassies and consulates for information (which is often in a foreign language.) It’s not ideal, but it’s an option.

Student Visa to a Work/Business Visa

Step 1: Find out which countries you can enter on a student visa

First of all, based on your passport, see which countries you can legally enter on a student visa. The easiest way to do this is to study the language of that country or do a TEFL course in that country.

Step 2: Find out which countries let you change a student visa to another visa type

Next, find out if it’s possible to modify a student visa. Sometimes there is a waiting period of a year or a few years, or you simply need a contract. Again, do your research and contact your embassy or consulate for visa information.
Another option is to teach English on a Fulbright grant. Check out this post for more information on finding grants to study and teach abroad.

Bonus: Teaching English Abroad with Dependents

teach abroad with family

Not everyone who wants to teach abroad is single! Don’t let the fact that you have a partner, children or other dependents keep you from teaching abroad.

Here’s some advice for teaching abroad with a family:

  • While some programs allow dependents, they won’t offer your dependents benefits like flights, a moving allowance or insurance. Make sure to set aside some extra money for this.
  • While some programs allow dependents, they won’t help you with your dependents’ visa paperwork. You’ll often be left on your own to apply for a visa for your family member. For example, if you get a visa to teach English in South Korea, you can apply for a dependent visa once you have yours.
  • If your children are school age, find out where they can attend school. Some countries will allow foreign children to attend local schools, while others will not. Your children may have to attend an international school close to where you are teaching. These schools often have high tuition fees.
  • Some dependent visas won’t allow your partner to work. If this is the case, what will your partner do? Schools want to know this before they hire you.
  • Getting a teaching job abroad when you have dependents is more challenging – but not impossible. Schools are more likely to hire teachers without dependents, especially in competitive cities. Look for smaller schools in more remote areas.
  • You might not have family style accommodation offered as part of your contract. Be aware that some schools provide accommodation, but it’s usually a studio style apartment.
  • The best way to teach abroad with a family is as a certified teacher at an international school. These schools offer qualified teachers and their families the chance to live and work abroad with proper work visas and benefits. Accommodation is more likely to be family friendly.

Final Thoughts

Getting a teaching job abroad is both exciting and overwhelming. In my experience, teaching abroad has been worth all the visa paperwork, searching for jobs and moving my life from country to country.

If you need extra help getting started teaching English abroad, please check out my programs to see if they are a good fit for you.

Teach Abroad Recommendation Program

Teach Abroad Recommendation Program – find out where you should teach abroad + application advice – 1 session

Teach Abroad Coaching Program

1:1 Teach Abroad Coaching Program – 5-week program for people who are new to teaching English abroad

Teach Abroad Consulting

Teach Abroad Consulting – fast track your teach abroad process with consulting packages

To see how I can best help you, please fill out this survey or email me at jamie@eslteacher365.com

Happy teaching and remember:

“The world is yours to teach and explore.”

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Certified Teacher, Teach Abroad Coach

I am passionate about helping people teach abroad & online so they can live a life of adventure!

I’ve taught in 6 different countries and love sharing my teach abroad (and online) tips and tricks.

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